LOOKING FOR OUR STUDENT SITE? Click here to visit intostudy.com
INTO News

Toward a new normal: INTO UAB team receives vaccines one year after COVID-19 pandemic began

INTO UAB Staff Getting Vaccinated (001)
keyboard_arrow_down

Toward a new normal: INTO UAB team receives vaccines one year after COVID-19 pandemic began

On this day last March, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the global COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. College campuses around the world began limiting operations, and students and faculty left classrooms and labs for weeks that soon turned into months. During this tumultuous time, those studying and working at universities have asked questions they never thought they would have to ask: What kinds of masks should I wear on campus, and how many? When and how should I get tested for coronavirus? In what setting is it okay to conduct in-person learning? And, above all others, when will life return to some semblance of normal?

On this day last March, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the global COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. College campuses around the world began limiting operations, and students and faculty left classrooms and labs for weeks that soon turned into months. During this tumultuous time, those studying and working at universities have asked questions they never thought they would have to ask: What kinds of masks should I wear on campus, and how many? When and how should I get tested for coronavirus? In what setting is it okay to conduct in-person learning? And, above all others, when will life return to some semblance of normal? One year after the pandemic began, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) strives to answer that ultimate question as they push campus and the local community toward a new normal by administering COVID-19 vaccines to faculty and staff, including the team at INTO The University of Alabama at Birmingham (INTO UAB). From the onset of the pandemic, UAB has served as a leading hub of COVID-19 testing and research in the United States.  In March 2020, the University opened the first community… Read the full article
On this day last March, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the global COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. College campuses around the world began limiting operations, and students and faculty left classrooms and labs for weeks that soon turned into months. During this tumultuous time, those studying and working at universities have asked questions they never thought they would have to ask: What kinds of masks should I wear on campus, and how many? When and how should I get tested for coronavirus? In what setting is it okay to conduct in-person learning? And, above all others, when will life return to some semblance of normal?

 

One year after the pandemic began, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) strives to answer that ultimate question as they push campus and the local community toward a new normal by administering COVID-19 vaccines to faculty and staff, including the team at INTO The University of Alabama at Birmingham (INTO UAB).

From the onset of the pandemic, UAB has served as a leading hub of COVID-19 testing and research in the United States.  In March 2020, the University opened the first community coronavirus testing site in Birmingham, Alabama, which now has the capacity to process 600 tests per day.  That same month, UAB launched the Urgent COVID-19 Research Fund, raising $1.1 million to support vaccine development, disease tracking systems, and novel therapeutic techniques.  Additionally, UAB Medicine treated countless infected members of the community throughout 2020 and into 2021.

In December 2020, UAB received 10,725 initial doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, at which time it began vaccinating health-care workers at UAB Medicine and other Jefferson County hospitals.  At the end of January, the vaccine was made available to all UAB faculty and staff, and members of the INTO UAB team were eager to register for their safe and effective COVID-19 vaccinations. 

Director of Student Experience Kyle Bailey was the first team member to be vaccinated, receiving his initial shot on February 3.  For Bailey, the vaccine was the latest in a long line of reasons for which he is proud to be a Blazer.

“Receiving the vaccine at UAB filled me with a strong sense of pride in my university,” Bailey said. “From day one of the pandemic, UAB has developed plans and policies and procedures with a common goal: keeping the campus community safe and healthy.  UAB United, Guidesafe, Healthcheck, and sentinel testing have all worked well to accomplish this goal.  The vaccine rollout was no different.”

David Hofmann, Executive Director of INTO UAB, received his first and second shots on February 17 and March 10, respectively, and he was equally proud to receive the vaccine.

“UAB, from the beginning of this pandemic, has been at the forefront of research, testing, and therapeutics, both domestically and internationally,” Hofmann said.  “We are very proud of all the work those who are here on campus at UAB have done.”

A majority of the INTO UAB team will have received both doses of their COVID-19 vaccines by March 12—a quick rollout that has made them optimistic for the future.  In the months ahead, they hope to see students vaccinated in addition to faculty and staff.  Hofmann explained that “once the Alabama Department of Public Health gives the green light, [UAB] will start vaccinating students, and that will include international students.”

“I’m hopeful that students will be able to return to the classroom soon,” Meghan Gilliland, Learning Resource Center Coordinator at INTO UAB, added.  “Students offer so much to the UAB and Birmingham communities that we’ve truly missed.”

After a year full of more questions than answers, the vaccine points to the end of our collective fight against COVID-19.  There is no denying that the post-pandemic world will look fundamentally different, but there is every reason to believe that new normal will find us tougher and closer together.

As Bailey reflected, “It’s not really my hope that things would go back exactly as before; rather, I want us to take the resiliency learned from a year of relative isolation and build a stronger community.”

Close the article

Walk a mile in her shoes: INTO Giving launches March gender equality campaign

On Monday, 8 March, the world celebrated International Women’s Day, honoring the integral role women play in the success of communities and countries everywhere while choosing to challenge the inequalities and biases women face. For INTO Giving, the philanthropic arm of INTO, International Women’s Day marked the start of the month-long “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” campaign, which, through a series of communications and a speaker event in partnership with Room to Read, will highlight the importance of gender equality in education and encourage INTO students and colleagues to take action against gender discrimination. Globally, women stand to earn less than their male peers for doing the same jobs, are more likely to hold less secure jobs, and are less likely to be covered by social protections.  Additionally, even though they work on the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis as health-care workers, researchers, and community and national leaders, women have disproportionately taken on the responsibilities of childcare and homeschooling during the pandemic, deepening pre-pandemic inequalities.   To combat gend… Read the full article
On Monday, 8 March, the world celebrated International Women’s Day, honoring the integral role women play in the success of communities and countries everywhere while choosing to challenge the inequalities and biases women face. For INTO Giving, the philanthropic arm of INTO, International Women’s Day marked the start of the month-long “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” campaign, which, through a series of communications and a speaker event in partnership with Room to Read, will highlight the importance of gender equality in education and encourage INTO students and colleagues to take action against gender discrimination.

 

Globally, women stand to earn less than their male peers for doing the same jobs, are more likely to hold less secure jobs, and are less likely to be covered by social protections.  Additionally, even though they work on the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis as health-care workers, researchers, and community and national leaders, women have disproportionately taken on the responsibilities of childcare and homeschooling during the pandemic, deepening pre-pandemic inequalities.  

To combat gender inequality and the bias, discrimination, and outdated cultural norms from which it stems, INTO Giving has supported the education of girls across the globe since its inception. 

“Women who miss out on education are at higher risk of poverty, child pregnancy and child marriage, and human trafficking,” Isabel Knight, fundraising and communications officer for INTO Giving, explained.  “However, when you educate a girl, you educate her community and, should she become a mother, her children too.  Benefits include: Reduced risk of HIV/AIDS, increased literacy, increased political engagement, and higher incomes.”

In the last three years, INTO Giving and its donors have contributed more than £140,000/$195,000 to projects that support girls’ education, such as Yayasan Usaha Mulia (YUM), which provides free afterschool tutoring to 170 schoolchildren in Cipanas, West Java, Indonesia, more than half of whom are girls, and a school in the remote Malagiri region of Nepal, 60% of whose attendees are girls.

It is with projects like these in mind that the INTO Giving team has launched the “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” campaign.  “In a literal sense, we thought about children walking to get an education, like children at our Malagiri project who used to walk two miles to school each way,” Knight said.  “Barriers like this will often mean girls stay at home rather than attend school.”

One of the ways in which INTO Giving has challenged students and colleagues to walk a mile in her shoes this month is by getting active—literally walking or running to raise awareness and funds for initiatives that support women.  Knight plans to run 100km in March in order to raise funds for INTO Giving and Refuge, an organisation that supports women and children experiencing domestic violence.  Through the iGive! initiative, Knight and other INTO employees and students can raise funds for humanitarian organisations like Refuge which do not count among INTO Giving projects.  INTO Giving will also add 20% to the total of funds raised through iGive!

In a non-literal sense, the campaign also calls on individuals to reflect on what life would be like as a woman whose experience varies from their own, and to take the time to better understand women’s issues.  To that end, Rocio Lopez, Development Director, UK, at Room to Read, will speak to INTO colleagues on 18 March about the importance of girls’ equal access to education, elaborating on how the £70,000/$104,000 INTO Giving will have contributed to Room to Read by 2022 positively impacts on the lives of girls in Sri Lanka.

By the conclusion of the campaign, Knight and the INTO Giving team hope to have empowered individuals to call out instances of gender inequality and bias as they encounter them in their day-to-day lives.  “We want our supporters to conclude the month feeling more informed, ready to challenge—not accept—that inequality is inevitable,” Knight said.

To affirm your commitment, you can join INTO Giving representatives and colleagues in centres in sharing a #ChoosetoChallenge selfie and tagging @intogiving on Instagram and Twitter.

Please consider donating to INTO Giving here.

Close the article
IG Yum

News, press release and media coverage archive add

keyboard_arrow_up