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Students use panel discussion to gain skills and raise awareness

Panel Discussion At WEC
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Students use panel discussion to gain skills and raise awareness

INTO London World Education Centre English teacher Arnaldo Griffin recently came up with a highly-engaging way to develop his students’ language skills. He hit upon the idea of asking Academic English students to organise an event to boost awareness of an issue that matters to them, and of using INTO Giving’s new iGive campaign to raise funds for it.

INTO London World Education Centre English teacher Arnaldo Griffin recently came up with a highly-engaging way to develop his students’ language skills. He hit upon the idea of asking Academic English students to organise an event to boost awareness of an issue that matters to them, and of using INTO Giving’s new iGive campaign to raise funds for it. Students debated a number of philanthropic topics in class, before deciding on climate change as their theme. They then decided that a panel discussion would be the best way to raise awareness of climate change, and researched who should be on the panel. It was then that things really got cooking. The students – 16 in all, from China, Japan, Russia, Kazakhstan and Thailand – created and divided up a list of tasks. These included: researching and contacting potential panellists; writing and desig… Read the full article
INTO London World Education Centre English teacher Arnaldo Griffin recently came up with a highly-engaging way to develop his students’ language skills. He hit upon the idea of asking Academic English students to organise an event to boost awareness of an issue that matters to them, and of using INTO Giving’s new iGive campaign to raise funds for it.

Students debated a number of philanthropic topics in class, before deciding on climate change as their theme. They then decided that a panel discussion would be the best way to raise awareness of climate change, and researched who should be on the panel.

It was then that things really got cooking. The students – 16 in all, from China, Japan, Russia, Kazakhstan and Thailand – created and divided up a list of tasks. These included: researching and contacting potential panellists; writing and designing a leaflet for the event; creating and practicing a presentation to introduce climate change to the audience; and promoting the event to students and faculty members around the London building.

Two of the experts approached by the students - Elaine Trimble (Director, Urban Infrastructure at Siemens) and Professor Michael Tamvakis (Director MSc in Energy, Trade & Finance at Cass Business School) – agreed to serve as panellists discussing climate change and business:

The students next decided to use the event to raise financial support to help victims of Hurricane Maria, which devastated families, communities and businesses in Puerto Rico in September 2017. The storm destroyed up to 90 per cent of housing on the island, leaving its 3.4 million inhabitants in dire need of healthcare, food and water.

Fundraising for Hurricane Maria relief took the form of £5 entry fee to the panel discussion and all who bought a ticket were entered into a prize draw, with the top prize an Amazon voucher donated by Catherine Mosquera, INTO Middlesex Street Catering Supervisor. 

All the entry fees (plus a few extra donations) amounted to £181.40. But because this money was channelled through INTO Giving’s iGive campaign, which tops up fundraised income by an extra 20 per cent, the grand total raised for Puerto Rican non-profit organisation PRIMA was £217.68 (US $295). Plus, the original £181.40 was matched through iGiveand donated to INTO Giving education projects around the world.

“This event was a fantastic way to engage students,” said David Silbergh, INTO London WEC Centre Director, who attended the event. “You could see it in them, all that energy and confidence.”

INTO Giving Director Chris Walker, who was also at the event, echoed that sentiment. “It’s bold stuff. Students are impassioned by philanthropic causes, they want to do something to help others.

“And there’s INTO Giving, an easy to reach tool for engaging with and teaching students. We’re seeing more and more of it, on both sides of the Atlantic, from INTO Glasgow Caledonian University, to INTO Marshall and now INTO WEC. Straight As, all around.”

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Emerald City is a valuable experience for INTO WSU students

Sixteen students and three INTO Washington State University employees recently boarded a charter bus for the first-ever fun-filled weekend exploring Seattle, Washington, fondly known as the Emerald City. Before setting off, the students were given a ‘Seattle Adventure Guide’ created by INTO WSU Student Experience team members, and containing details of restaurants, shopping and attractions. And, after checking in to their hotel in the middle of Seattle, everyone ventured downtown for shopping at Seattle City Center, followed by dinner. Next day, the group rushed around Seattle’s ‘must-see’ attractions, and spent a fun-filled few hours at Pike Place Market, Seattle waterfront, and China Town. The… Read the full article
Sixteen students and three INTO Washington State University employees recently boarded a charter bus for the first-ever fun-filled weekend exploring Seattle, Washington, fondly known as the Emerald City.

Before setting off, the students were given a ‘Seattle Adventure Guide’ created by INTO WSU Student Experience team members, and containing details of restaurants, shopping and attractions. And, after checking in to their hotel in the middle of Seattle, everyone ventured downtown for shopping at Seattle City Center, followed by dinner.

Next day, the group rushed around Seattle’s ‘must-see’ attractions, and spent a fun-filled few hours at Pike Place Market, Seattle waterfront, and China Town. The trip ended with a memorable ride on the Seattle Great Wheel.

The following morning, everyone hopped back on to the bus for the journey back to WSU, and when they arrived there was a group chorus from the students of: “Ah, it feels good to be home.”

In fact, the Seattle trip was such a success that INTO WSU plans to make it into an annual event, and to organise more retreats for students in the future. For photos for the INTO WSU Seattle trip, please click here.

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INTO Marshall’s year of giving generously

Throughout 2017, students, faculty and employees at INTO Marshall University have baked, sang, socialised and played together to raise money for INTO Giving – INTO’s global nonprofit charity that focuses primarily on education. "This year, INTO employees and students at universities in the US and UK have all piled in to select the INTO Giving projects they are going to support, and have turned around and raised money for them,” said INTO Giving Director Chris Walker. Anastasia Shepherd, Chairperson for Marshall INTO Giving explained that students in the Service Learning Class took part in a five-week project called ‘Money Tree:’ "The students started with $20 at the beginning of the class, and had five weeks to turn th… Read the full article
Throughout 2017, students, faculty and employees at INTO Marshall University have baked, sang, socialised and played together to raise money for INTO Giving – INTO’s global nonprofit charity that focuses primarily on education.

"This year, INTO employees and students at universities in the US and UK have all piled in to select the INTO Giving projects they are going to support, and have turned around and raised money for them,” said INTO Giving Director Chris Walker.

Anastasia Shepherd, Chairperson for Marshall INTO Giving explained that students in the Service Learning Class took part in a five-week project called ‘Money Tree:’ "The students started with $20 at the beginning of the class, and had five weeks to turn that into as much money as they could at the end,” she said.

The class split into two and organised a series of activities, including a bake-off competition (pictured), to see which group could raise the most money. "One group worked towards raising funds for a school in Thailand, and the other raised money for a school in Lebanon for Syrian refugee schoolchildren," said ESL Instructor and Fundraiser Coordinator for Marshall INTO Giving Siham Elougli.

Henna tattoos, video game competitions amongst students, karaoke nights, and movies on the laewn got the students very excited about fundraising for INTO Giving during their money tree events. In all, their efforts resulted in a donation of $323 during the five week period.

Money Tree is an ideal way to deliver valuable concepts and language and life skills to students, while doing actual good, added Siham. "I see Money Tree as an educational tool for our students. It teaches them the ideal of fundraising and all of the work that goes into that. From planning the events, to making things like fliers to advertise the events, and keeping track of their money.”

This past year has also seen much INTO Giving activity among the rest of the INTO Marshall faculty and staff. A team volunteered at the Huntington Rails and Ales Festival in August which raised $1,000 USD.

And, to top 2017 off, in early December, INTO Marshall ran its second annual Holiday Gift Wrapping Fundraiser, where INTO Faculty and Staff relieved some of the stress of the holiday season by wrapping presents in exchange for donations to INTO Giving.

In all, across the year, students and employees at INTO Marshall have raised $1,497.00 USD from December 2016 to December 2017 for INTO Giving – which, said Chris Walker, shows the generosity of everyone involved.

"One of the interesting things is that most of the funds we receive come from those who don’t come from wealthy backgrounds, but are still determined[JR1]  to lend a hand, however they can –$5 here, $10 there, $20 there,” he said. “But, collectively, the efforts of everyone across INTO has added up to a total of $100,000 (£75,000) donated to global education projects this year - and that kind of money goes miles when you are sending money to the developing world."

For more about INTO Marshall please click here, and for information about INTO Giving and how you can help, please visit their website.


 [JR1]Corrected spelling 

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INTO Marshall INTO Giving

Oregon State University flag ceremony celebrates diversity

For 50 weeks of the year the students, faculty and guests who walk through the Memorial Union Concourse at Oregon State University are greeted by a vast and colorful display of world flags lining the high-ceilinged halls. But each year, these walls are eerily empty during the two weeks preceding International Education Week. “When we take down the flags in the MU Concourse, you can feel how bare and blank the space is without their color and energy,” said Julianna Betjemann, INTO OSU’s Director of Student Experience. For the past several years, the university has practiced this ritual of removing the flags before ceremoniously re-hanging them to celebrate International Education Week. “This moment gives the community a chance to reflect on what international students bring to our campus,” added Julianna. “These flag… Read the full article
For 50 weeks of the year the students, faculty and guests who walk through the Memorial Union Concourse at Oregon State University are greeted by a vast and colorful display of world flags lining the high-ceilinged halls. But each year, these walls are eerily empty during the two weeks preceding International Education Week.

“When we take down the flags in the MU Concourse, you can feel how bare and blank the space is without their color and energy,” said Julianna Betjemann, INTO OSU’s Director of Student Experience.

For the past several years, the university has practiced this ritual of removing the flags before ceremoniously re-hanging them to celebrate International Education Week.

“This moment gives the community a chance to reflect on what international students bring to our campus,” added Julianna. “These flags honor our diverse student population and celebrate Oregon State University’s global community.”

The university’s international student population includes over 3,800 students from 110 countries.

“When I saw [my flag], I felt a sense of pride,” said Simon Struijk, an international student from the Netherlands who is studying economics. “I think that both domestic and international students benefit from living and studying in an environment in which all sorts of belief systems and cultures are represented.”

For many, the flag rehanging ceremony serves as a reminder of the positive impact that various cultures have on their school, community and lives.

“Sometimes, even as faculty, we think that our work is culture free—but it’s not,” said Dr Charlene Alexander, Chief Diversity Officer at Oregon State University.

Charlene, who immigrated to the United States from Venezuela in 1980, delivered a strong message of welcome to the international students at the ceremony.

“You may not know who you’ll touch or how you’ll impact them, but the difference that you bring enhances our culture,” she said. “You belong here.”

No longer bare, the halls of the Memorial Union will continue to pay respect to OSU’s diverse international student population for another exciting year. Click here for more information and recent news about the international student population at Oregon State University. 

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OSU Flag Ceremony

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