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Hillary Clinton inspires INTO Gloucestershire students at festival

Ana And Juan For Website
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Hillary Clinton inspires INTO Gloucestershire students at festival

Two INTO University of Gloucestershire (UoG) students were lucky enough to hear former US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak about politics, feminism and equality - and how you can recover from failure - at this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival.

Two INTO University of Gloucestershire (UoG) students were lucky enough to hear former US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak about politics, feminism and equality - and how you can recover from failure - at this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival. This special event, which formed part of the festival and was sponsored by the University of Gloucestershire, coincided with the launch of Hillary’s book, What Happened? in which she describes the ups and downs she encountered during the US election campaign last year. Many international students at INTO University of Gloucestershire entered a prize draw for two sought-after tickets to the event and, by sheer coincidence, the winners were both from Colombia! Here, Ana Maria Espinel Choachi and J… Read the full article
Two INTO University of Gloucestershire (UoG) students were lucky enough to hear former US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak about politics, feminism and equality - and how you can recover from failure - at this year’s Cheltenham Literature Festival.

This special event, which formed part of the festival and was sponsored by the University of Gloucestershire, coincided with the launch of Hillary’s book, What Happened? in which she describes the ups and downs she encountered during the US election campaign last year.

Many international students at INTO University of Gloucestershire entered a prize draw for two sought-after tickets to the event and, by sheer coincidence, the winners were both from Colombia! Here, Ana Maria Espinel Choachi and Juan Diego Velasquez Angel share their impressions of Hillary’s speech at the Centaur, Cheltenham Racecourse.

General English student Ana, says: “The auditorium was huge and we were in the fifth row- we were really close. Hillary came in and did an interview about her new book. After that she started to talk about everything - her life, how she felt after everything that had happened with the election. I remember when the election results happened - everyone was shocked- even me. She was really shocked- she really thought she would win.

“She not only talked about the election, she also talked about things that we, as a society, should think about and talk about. For example social media – how it’s affecting countries’ politics and economics. You may think it’s just a way to socialise, but it’s a way to influence people’s decisions, so that makes me think a lot about it and be more careful.

“Hillary is so professional and prepared, but the election loss shows things like this can happen to anyone. It makes me think, ‘you just have to keep moving.’ She also talked about feminism – the role of women in life, in society. She said that maybe the world was not ready to have a woman president of the United States.

“The thing that inspired me most was her talking about feminism- the encouragement and empowerment for women. When I go back to my country, I want to be part of the difference - I feel motivated. She said after the election results that she was lying in bed and didn’t want to do anything, and was thinking ‘what happened?!’ and that’s the name of her book. The good thing is that she rose above what happened. She rose above the election loss and talked about making plans for the future. It was a wonderful experience – it was a privilege.”

Juan Diego, who is also studying General English, says: “Hillary talked about equality – how it really matters and how it should be talked about in schools. Each person has something to say. In many cases, a woman has an idea and tells people, but the fact she’s a woman means it is not really listened to, but if a man comes along and says the same thing, it is listened to.

“There were a lot of important points – how is the world changing, how technologies are changing politics, for example social media is really important nowadays. I really liked that she was talking informally. She was talking about these deep questions, but talking like a normal person, making jokes. I think the experience taught me that you can recover from a big failure.”

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INTO Drew students bring the story of New York to life

It’s easy to get so caught up in the excitement of modern New York that you fail to appreciate that behind the store windows, bright lights, theaters and restaurants lie layers of human struggle, ambition and achievement. To truly understand the essence and origins of today’s great city, you really have to see it for yourself through new eyes. Such was the thinking of INTO Drew University Academic English professor Maz Nikoui when he came up with a rather unusual assignment for the students in his special topics elective class - NYC: Yesterday and Today - which featured such topics as New Amsterdam (Manhattan in the 1600s); culture and art in NYC; and NYC in hard times (World War II,9/11, etc.). For their final assignment, he challenged the students to research and organize a trip to tell the stories of some of the city’s iconic sight… Read the full article
It’s easy to get so caught up in the excitement of modern New York that you fail to appreciate that behind the store windows, bright lights, theaters and restaurants lie layers of human struggle, ambition and achievement. To truly understand the essence and origins of today’s great city, you really have to see it for yourself through new eyes.

Such was the thinking of INTO Drew University Academic English professor Maz Nikoui when he came up with a rather unusual assignment for the students in his special topics elective class - NYC: Yesterday and Today - which featured such topics as New Amsterdam (Manhattan in the 1600s); culture and art in NYC; and NYC in hard times (World War II,9/11, etc.).

For their final assignment, he challenged the students to research and organize a trip to tell the stories of some of the city’s iconic sights and buildings. “I came up with this idea because I wanted the students to know more about NYC than just the superficial shopping and tourist traps they kept on going to,” said Maz.

The students sent out a formal invitation to ‘A day in Manhattan,’ which read: “Today we have planned a walking tour of Manhattan. Our goal is to explore the city in a new way. Not only are we going to see famous landmarks, but we are also going to provide interesting facts and stories about the locations we will stop at. Hope you are all ready for a memorable experience. Fuhgeddabout it! – Maz & The Special Topics Gang.”

Students took turns guiding the group around oft-filmed landmarks, giving glimpses into their history along the way. Yuki took on the challenge of the Beaux-Arts style Grand Central Station; Adam did full justice to Art Deco gem The Chrysler Building; and Steve spoke movingly about the World Trade Center/9/11 Memorial.

Maz was impressed by the students’ immense enthusiasm and sense of adventure. “What really stood out to me was that I felt students were thirsty to learn more! They felt like true New Yorkers!” he said.

“We had lunch at a diner on Broadway, rode the subway, and ended our journey with a fine latte and canolli in Little Italy. I mean, having international students doing this and willingly going out of their comfort zone was a big deal for me and for themselves. I truly feel that they saw not only NYC, but life in the US from a new lens.

“They blew my expectations away! I thought they would show me a few places, and head back to Drew. But, no. We walked, and walked, and walked. And we finally got back to Drew at 9pm!

When asked whether the learning objectives had been met, his answer was an unqualified ‘yes’! “I was hoping for them to get a deeper understanding of life in the US by exploring the culture of NYC - and that is exactly what happened!” he said.

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New York Visit For Website

Former INTO GCU student spreads his wings with work placement

Elmergue Germano is taking international study to a whole new level. Having left his home country of Angola for Scotland in January 2014, aged just 20, he is now, four years later, setting off for an exciting, nine-month work placement at Airbus DS, an aerospace engineering company in Germany. Elmergue’s study journey shows his talent and his determination to succeed. Having passed the English for University study and Foundation Engineering programmes at INTO GCU, he has spent the last three years working towards a degree in Mechanical Power Plant Systems and Engineering at Glasgow Caledonian University. Elmergue said: “Studying at INTO GCU was a great experience. First of all because of the way the programme was structured, and also the fact that it felt like home. When I first got h… Read the full article
Elmergue Germano is taking international study to a whole new level. Having left his home country of Angola for Scotland in January 2014, aged just 20, he is now, four years later, setting off for an exciting, nine-month work placement at Airbus DS, an aerospace engineering company in Germany.

Elmergue’s study journey shows his talent and his determination to succeed. Having passed the English for University study and Foundation Engineering programmes at INTO GCU, he has spent the last three years working towards a degree in Mechanical Power Plant Systems and Engineering at Glasgow Caledonian University.

Elmergue said: “Studying at INTO GCU was a great experience. First of all because of the way the programme was structured, and also the fact that it felt like home. When I first got here, it was actually my first time being abroad by myself and my INTO family helped me settle in.

“I just recently finished my third year of my bachelor’s degree and now I have managed to get myself an internship in Germany with an aerospace engineering company. I will be staying in Germany for the next nine months on placement before returning to Glasgow to complete my fourth and final year.

“I am excited to go to Germany, but studying in Glasgow is a very rewarding experience. Glasgow is a very multi-cultural place and it is also good for you to expand your horizons. I like Glasgow because it is a very lively city and there are a lot of things to do, but also there’s the fact that Scotland itself has recently been voted the most beautiful country in the world. But my favourite thing about Glasgow specifically is the people and I like the signs that say ‘People make Glasgow’.

“I have met a lot of friends here, basically I can say that I have friends from all over the world and it’s been great to get to speak to people from different cultures and to learn about their background as well and also the language. For example, I know a little bit of Chinese, and Malay, and some other languages as well.”

Academic Director, Charlotte Craig said: “Elmergue Germano was a sheer joy to have on the EUS and subsequently the Foundation Engineering programmes. I think all of the teaching team and student services team would agree with me in saying that he is a star student.

“His enthusiasm for his studies and his friendly demeanour meant that he quickly made friends and did extremely well in his academic studies. Not only that, he happily got involved with activities outside of the classroom environment and built some strong bonds with his peers. It is really encouraging to learn that he is keeping up the same level of commitment to academic study and life in the School of Engineering and Built Environment (SEBE). I wish him all the best for his next adventure on placement in Germany.”

 

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Elmergue For Website

INTO partner UEA’s Nobel Prize-winning formula

Although he can’t be said to fit into the usual definition of international student, this year’s Nobel Prize in Literature winner, Kazuo Ishiguro has a distinctly global view. The Nagasaki-born author, who came to England when he was five years old, says that growing up in a Japanese family in the UK was a crucial factor to his success as a writer, as it allowed him to see things from a different perspective. Another key influence on this creator of such celebrated novels as The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, was the MA in Creative Writing at INTO partner the University of East Anglia (UEA), which he completed in 1980, having previously gained a BA in English… Read the full article
Although he can’t be said to fit into the usual definition of international student, this year’s Nobel Prize in Literature winner, Kazuo Ishiguro has a distinctly global view.

The Nagasaki-born author, who came to England when he was five years old, says that growing up in a Japanese family in the UK was a crucial factor to his success as a writer, as it allowed him to see things from a different perspective.

Another key influence on this creator of such celebrated novels as The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, was the MA in Creative Writing at INTO partner the University of East Anglia (UEA), which he completed in 1980, having previously gained a BA in English and Philosophy from the University of Kent.

In an anthology compiled in 2011 for the 40th anniversary of UEA’s Creative Writing programme, Kazuo wrote of his first weeks in Norfolk and on campus: “I had that autumn arrived with my one suitcase, a guitar and a portable Olivetti typewriter in Buxton, Norfolk – a small village with an old water mill and flat farm fields all around it. I’d come to this place because I’d been accepted on a one-year postgraduate Creative Writing course at the University of East Anglia.”

It was a highly creative time for Kazuo and his fellow students, as Malcolm Bradbury, founder and director of the Creative Writing Master’s degree, and UEA writer in residence Angela Carter were both influential presences in what has since become known as one of the UK’s most prestigious and successful creative writing MA programmes.

Since his first novel, A Pale View of Hills was published in 1982, Kazuo has developed into one of the most appreciated and celebrated authors in the English-speaking world. He has been nominated four times for the Man Booker Prize, which he won with The Remains of the Day in 1989, and his novel, Never Let Me Go, was named by Time magazine as the best novel of 2005.

Kazuo continues to write, and his latest novel The Buried Giant was published in 2015, again to much acclaim. He does, however, remember where it all began, and returned to the scene of his inspiration, UEA, earlier this month, to attend the University’s Literary Festival and give a masterclass to current MA students. Students are able to progress on to the BA in Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia from the INTO UEA Foundation Course.

Photo by Jeff Cottenden

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Kazuo Ishiguro For Website

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